Scott Running Shoes Review

Experience from Real Runs with Scott Kinabalu Running Shoes

Tech: Scott e-Ride Rocker

They are very light using a cushioning material called Aero Foam but, the real key innovation in my opinion is e-Ride. Essentially the shoes are slightly curved to create a rocker. This reduces heel strike getting the runner onto their forefoot quicker. It improves posture by increasing the cadence and reducing the tendency to lean forward at the waist, which is the biggest error most runners make in their posture. The result is a shoe that makes you more efficient, feeling light on your feet.

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“Like the modest champion sitting in the corner listening as others spit their egos all over each other, Scott quietly lets its achievements, its victories, its skills speak for themselves…”

Use: Has Scott Created a Real ‘All-Rounder’?

A lot of our customers run a few times a week on various different terrain and enter a variety of events. They could be doing a road 10km one week and a few weeks later a trail ½ marathon. As they only run a few times a week and do lots of other things too that cost money they want one shoe to cover all bases.

This is hard for the running shoe designers to do. A good trail shoe has a softer rubber than a road shoe to give better grip, this wears out quicker on the road. Trail shoes have a heavily lugged outsole to give good traction on loose or muddy terrain on the road this effects the ride of the shoe making them feel bulky and slow. Road running shoes need a deep mid-sole so that your feet can sink into the cushioning, this cushioning lifts your foot of the floor making you very unstable on rough ground and so most trail shoes aren’t as well cushioned as road shoes.

All this was true until Scott developed the T2 Kinabalua and Kinabalu Supertrac.

Click Below to Browse the Range in Mens and Womens

The mid-sole is the same thickness as the road running models and is firmer and more responsive than most other running shoe brands. This is because of the e-Ride rocker. From the moment the runner touches the ground they are being rolled forward so there isn’t as much compression of the mid-sole. If you have a lot of softer cushioning, you’re potentially wasting some energy as you ‘sink’ into the cushioning and need to propel yourself out. This makes the shoe stable off-road but, still cushioned and comfortable enough for road use. The outsole has a rubber compound that is both durable enough for road use yet grippy enough for tracks like the reconditioned footpaths on the North Yorkshire Moors, which are notoriously slippy!

I have had a number of Scott Kinabalu’s now and have used them for everything.

Running into the Northern Runner Newcastle store from Winlaten Mill is the perfect example of how versatile the shoe is. I have confidence on the muddy tracks down by the river and the wooden edged steps because the shoe is genuinely grippy enough for you to built a bit of pace. Yet when you get to the last few miles running down the main road, which is hard concrete in most places the Scott Kinabalu just glides along as comfortable and effortless as any road shoe.

Winner: You Know a Shoe is OK When The Pros Use (and Win) In It!

A notable victory that shows just what terrain this range can handle is Tadei Pivk’s victory in the Zegema Aizkorri Sky Running Race. It’s a tough mountain race, across essentially marathon distance. The climbs and descents are notoriously muddy in wet conditions like in 2015. Plus 5th place finisher Marco De Gasperi (who is also 6 times World Mountain Champion) was also wearing the Scott Kinabalu!

If you are looking for a versatile running shoe that you can use over a variety terrains then you need to try any of the Scott Kinabalu range (T2 Kinabalu, Kinabalu Supertrac).

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Please feel free to send us an email with your requirements, the type of shoes you usually use and more to sales@northernrunner.com and we can make a recommendation.

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